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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 73 (some duplicates have been removed)
, kathy. it's because of her i'm here today and here at the city university. i sworn after i left maryland having left rutgers i would not go back to the university again. i'm glad i have broken that promise to myself and here. it's a pleasure to be on the podium again. we met in the '70s what we were both regarded as a radical scholar. some might not think that anymore. francis and i were asked by james mcgreger burns to be the co-chair of the american political science invention program. we came up with a program that even i think jim burns was a little alarmed by. he in fact put in to action. i have known francis since then. she has remained an honest and authentic voice of progressivism and radicalism with a deep interest with those they have shown -- the homeless and the poor. not how they can be helped but how they find ways to help themselves through the movement and work that they do. it's a pleasure to have her perspective this afternoon in responding to these comments. i'm very pleasured to jackie davis, the chairman of the -- and rachel and members of the executive committee the
and complex engineering. man: water is essential to the economic viability of new york city. reliable infrastructure and reliable delivery of water is a must. you have to reinvest in the infrastructure every single minute to keep it current. hurwitz: we have the stock exchange, we have the united nations -- failure can have a dramatic impact on the nation, and even internationally. so there's a really keen awareness that you always have to be fixing the system. things corrode, they rust. they get to where you turn them on and nothing happens. but it is so totally used in every nook and cranny, that making any accommodation to shut it down, to do something to it, is very difficult. narrator: two massive underground tunnels, called simply tunnel 1 and tunnel 2, provide most of the city's water supply. they run hundreds of feet below manhattan, far deeper than the subways. built at the beginning of the 20th century, they are concrete-lined and bored through solid rock. they could last centuries. but the mechanical equipment within them will not. engineers in the 1950s discovere
: two massive underground tunnels, called simply tunnel 1 and tunnel 2, provide most of the city's water supply. they run hundreds of feet below manhattan, far deeper than the subways. built at the beginning of the 20th century, they are concrete-lined and bored through solid rock. they could last centuries. but the mechanical equipment within them will not. engineers in the 1950s discovered rust on the tunnel's valves. there were concerns that if they closed the valves for tunnel inspections, they may never open again, leaving new york city without water. so they chose to keep them open. as a result, there has not been significant inspection, maintenance, or repair of the tunnels in decades. no one knows their current condition. hurwitz: currently, city tunnel 1 and city tunnel number 2 would be feeding each half of the city. so you'd lose half the city if you didn't have a replacement. narrator: without half of its water supply, the city would shut down. for nearly 40 years, new york has been in the process of constructing a solution. man: this project is water tunnel number 3. we star
on water and wastewater infrastructure systems are actually paying for it. narrator: cities and municipalities across the united states are now facing this funding gap, between projected revenue and projected expenses, as they strive to maintain water quality and meet demand. new york is the most densely populated city in the u.s. and over 40 million tourists visit the city every year. the 1.3 billion gallons of water required every day are delivered by a system of extraordinary scale and complex engineering. man: water is essential to the economic viability of new york city. reliable infrastructure and reliable delivery of water is a must. you have to reinvest in the infrastructure every single minute to keep it current. hurwitz: we have the stock exchange, we have the united nations -- failure can have a dramatic impact on the nation, and even internationally. so there's a really keen awareness that you always have to be fixing the system. things corrode, they rust. they get to where you turn them on and nothing happens. but it is so totally used in every nook and cranny,
in the city at mount royal. a crash with possible lane closures. parade closures in effect at 10:00 this morning. commerce street to pratt street to howard street. that starts at 10:30 this morning. the topside of the beltway is looking good. no delays just yet. that is the latest on traffic pulse 11. >> your superbowl champions are back in baltimore this morning. >> the city has been preparing a huge victory pray that we will bring you live. sarah sampson is live at the stadium. what can we expect? >> the parade will start at 10:45 this morning. we are starting to see some fans gather. people will probably want to give themselves extra time. the parade begins at city hall and ends at m&t bank stadium. it will go south on commerce street. then a continues onto pratt street and howard street. parking is free for fans at the stadium. that opens at 9:00 a.m. this morning. no tailgating. city workers spent the day setting up scaffolding yesterday. putting up fencing for crowd control. >> i am very excited. when you're watching at night and anticipate the ravens win and all the hard w
will take a victory lap around charm city. there is tucker barnes. >> how is it going up there? >> it is great. i do want to tell everybody, heads up here, it is cold outside this morning. temperatures have fallen back into the low to mid-30s. so i'm here at baltimore city hall. big celebration scheduled to tart at 10:45 this morning. they will have a big parade through the city. it will wind down through the inare harbor and eventually wine up at m & t stadium. they are encouraging everybody who is a ravens fan to come out. it is a free celebration. you get to see the players and coach. a lot to look forward to this morning. very quiet out here now. the event kick off here at baltimore city hall and again at 10:45, we are expecting to hear from the mayor of baltimore and maybe a few other dignitaries before the celebrations kick off. let's tuck weather real quick. i mentioned the coal temperatures. can't feel the fingers or toes. make sure you have gloves if you are out and about. when i left d.c., we had partial clearing. the flurry activity of the light snow we expected last
of new york city is dead at the age of 88. >>> alaskan flight, the pilot passing out in the cockpit. the first officer forced to take control. >>> and the superstar and the super bowl, beyonce uses her singing voice to silence some of her critics. ♪ and the rockets red glare >> vowing to sing live on sunday as america gets set for its big game. >> and we're getting set with al in san francisco and natalie live in baltimore "today," friday, february 1st, 2013. >> announcer: from nbc news, this is "today" with matt lauer and savannah guthrie, live from studio 1a in rockefeller plaza. >>> good morning. welcome to "today" on a friday morning. i'm matt lauer. >> good morning, everyone. i'm savannah guthrie. you did not have to grow up in new york city to know the name ed koch, who served as mayor for three terms from 1978 to 1989 and used his sometimes combative style to help rescue the city from near financial ruin. >> i did grow up around here. he was a force. when you would come across a voter, he would always say, how am i doing? am i doing okay? he died overnight at new york presb
ready for some football? i know that i am. not that there's much of a choice in my home city of new orleans. there's no ignoring it. super bowl xlvii has come to town. the superdome is the place to be. the baltimore ravens are facing off against the san francisco 49ers. itis the best i can do if it's not the new orleans saints. they will be join d by the 110 million people watching on television. they are a captive side show for super bowl ads. they are costing $4 million for each 30 second spot. they will take it all in while consuming 1.2 billion chicken wings. 4 million pizzas and 50 million cases of beer. there's no denying our love affair with the game. alongside those numbers, this year's super bowl comes with another set of numbers that made that love much more complicated than ever. these new numbers could make cte as ewe nonmouse with football as nfl. it's chronic traumatic enreceive lolg, a brain disease caused by trauma to the head and the scientific evidence points to the connection between this long-term brain disease and the concussions and collisions that are part of
" is the best thing that we can find to explain the sequester. but first, the death of a great american city. >>> good morning. i'm melissa harris-perry. this week, the news out of the midwest was that of a city in crisis. detroit, michigan, once the nation's richest city per capita, once the nation's fifth largest city, once a symbol of u.s. innovation, industry and success, is in such dire straits that the city is in need of an intervention. on tuesday afternoon, a panel of state-appointed experts released their findings that the city of detroit faces quote, a financial emergency, one which they say the city is not equipped to address. as a result, detroit may soon become the largest american municipality in history to file for bankruptcy. the decision may be left to just one person. if michigan governor rick snider decides to act on the panel's report and appoint an emergency financial manager, a decision expected to be made in the coming week. key findings of the six-person panel include that the detroit police department has more than 2,000 employees but no accurate information on how t
to police go to wjz.com. >>> city police have identified the two people shot to death and left in a burning car last week. they're identified as 33-year- old alysia strickland and 34- year-old taewon tuck. the burning car was found in an alley on clifton avenue friday morning. the two people inside had gunshot wounds to their head and that strickland was a graduate student at morgan state university. >>> thousands descend on annapolis. they're pushing for a multibillion dollars construction plan to fix crumbling classrooms. wjz and mike schuh are live with the latest. >> good morning mike. >> reporter: good morning everyone. thousands say they need their voices to be heard. if you want to help maryland they say you must help baltimore first. >> a few thousand students, city leaders and concerned citizens rallied in front of the state house in annapolis monday. they are advocates for baltimore schools and demanding more money to fund them. >> it's time for better buildings, better baltimore, better maryland. >> phillipe jackson is the princ
>> for more information on tvs recent visit to santa fe, new mexico another city visited by her local content vehicle, visit c-span.org/local content. ..a?xx i first came to washington, d.c. in 2000 as a congressional correspondent for the associated press. after spending several years in colombia south carolina and albany new york. now, i am originally from mississippi, the son of two public school teachers come in and being from mississippi, the one thing my parents made sure that i knew was my history. it was almost a state requirement in mississippi to know where you came from. so, when i left mississippi to go to south carolina, i had this desire to history and i studied the history of south carolina. i didn't the same thing when i went to upstate new york. i got involved in learning the african-american history of upstate new york which, by the way, is very vibrant. a lot of the underground railroads ended in upstate new york city have a very vibrant african-american community and history up there. but when i left albany new york to come to washington, d.c., and i knew i
at an incredible rate of two to three inches an hour in some spots. >> up to 12 inches in new york city to an incredible 3 feet in parts of connecticut. boston got smacked with two feet, leaving people there with a new big dig to deal with. ron who used to live in boston will remember the big dig. it was the largest public works project in the history of mankind. we have a new project for boston now. >> an extreme weather team is where the snow is this morning. fanned out across the storm zone. with the latest on what's to come, how to handle it when you get back on the roads, as well. >> our coverage of the blizzard of 2013, sam champion and ginger zee. let's go first to sam, our weather editor in new york's columbus circle this morning. sam, good morning. >> good morning, dan and bianna. we're on a side street here. this is andrew. we've been helping him dig out from the snowfall totals. this is his car. we're going to get it out for him this morning. we have the eight inches of snow. andrew, i'll step on the other side of this. and you keep going. we got about that eight inches of sn
in this investigation. wjz is live at city police headquarters. investigator mike hellgren has the new information from detectives. mike? >> reporter: denise, this is a story that is nothing short of heartbreaking. there's a family tonight who has yet to bury a 15-year-old high school freshman. but there's also hope in new pictures, including one exclusive to wjz that police hope will solve this case. >> reporter: police released images showing the brutal attack on 15-year-old deon tay smith. they believe they showed the teen responsible for stabbing him to death outside the mcdonald's, outside of howard and fayette. smith was among the more than 200,000 ravens fans who daght -- gathered downtown to celebrate tuesday. wjz was this, as family members came to the teenager's home in east baltimore to comfort his mother. some wore memorial t-shirts. the victim's uncle remembers his nephew as a wonderful young man. >> i do not want to say anything or have the family do anything to jeopardize an ongoing investigation. this is a time for my family and for the baltim
responsible for our own security. we've actually relied in over 275 different cities around the world, where our embassies and consulates are, we rely on host governments, on security forces, on the militaries and police forces in host countries so it's a joint responsibility, and obviously the state department will have to look into this and try to determine who is responsible. >> nicholas burns, former ambassador, thank you so much for joining us this morning. we'll have much more from turkey later on ins in ns s i"cnn news" >>> the colorful mayor of new york city has died, much beloved. his signature line? >> am i doing all right? am i doing okay? >> yeah, we remember that, the 88-year-old koch had been in and out of the hospital recently. he died of congestive heart failure. his funeral will be monday in a synagogue near central park. koch served three terms as mayor starting in 1978. he later found a new rule for his jubilant combative personality on the people's court and hosted a radio show and never left his beloved hometown. let's bring in john berman in new york, so what will be th
. >> and i'm julie haener. this is a tragic night for the city of santa cruz. who officers shot to death in a city that has not even lost one offer -- officer in the line of duty. detective sergeant lauren butch baker, 27 years with the department and detective elizabeth butler 10 years with the department have been identified as the victims. police also killed the gunman, matt keller is live at the scene. >> reporter: that briefing with investigators and santa cruz's major just ended -- santa cruz' mayor just gave the statement. the first shots came at 3:30 at a house across the street from a whole foods market and schools skwr-tz i heard a round of 40 to -- >> i heard a round of 40 to 50 shots across the street from where our children are. >> we lost two exceptionally fine officers today. >> reporter: a suspect was also shot to death but the sheriff said he ordered a door to door search as the sun went down just to make sure there was not another suspect. with many people still trapped inside the perimeter. >> s.w.a.t. teams you know told her to stay down and she's been down ever sin
two fetish fares in san francisco. there are only three other cities in the world that do that. new york, toronto, and berlin. i have been to all three and they are not nearly the same size as well we produced, or nearly as diverse. what we are always thinking about is what we are offering people that is so quintessentially san francisco that we get -- it cannot be gotten anywhere else. we are also told the switching of the entertainment this year. we have dance areas where the slides used to be. i think that for us it is about making sure that people, even if they came to san francisco in particular five years ago, that they are not experiencing the fight -- the same thing. it speaks to one of the priorities. the never-ending city. or something. i do not remember, exactly, but it is the same basic concept. even if you come here several times over and over, you will not have the same experience. as we do that, enhancing certain things. live stages have big-name bands. headlining the folsom street fair, people are now looking forward to our entertainment in ways they did not 10 years
and hoda kotb from universal city walk at universal studios, hollywood. >> oh, boy. >> huh? >> she's going to make a special stop on the tour right here on universal studio walk. >> uh-oh. stop over there. >> i went to the ladies room. >> of course you did. that's what you do. >> i like the change of scenery. i like it. >> hope you enjoy doing the show out front. >> hi, everybody. >> whoa. >> thank you. >> ladies, welcome to universal studios, hollywood, universal city walk. have a great show. >> oh, oh, oh, oh. >> can you feel the love? >> hoda, we can feel the love. we are so in love with southern california. >> sit down. take a load off. >> get comfy. get cozy. >> we have a little issue here at universal studios, hollywood on city walk. we want to thank the los angeles bureau -- >> l.a. tourism board. >> that's what i meant. >> we keep thanking them every day. if i had my way, we would keep thanking them for the next two months, you know what i'm saying? >> of course you would. since you came out today on this beautiful sun-splashed day in l.a., somebody in this audience is going to get
are finally home, telling their stories of their misadventures at city. -- sea. randall pinkston has the latest from wjz from the port of mobile, alabama. >>> to a shipyard friday. the u.s. coast guard and national transportation safety board. triumph may be moved to the bahamas for cleanup and repair because. >> it is almost like returning to the scene of the crime. >> reporter: after a hot shower, she returns home to texas. she said enduring the squalor conditions on the ship was life changing. >> made us appreciate things we have, electricity, flushing toilets, running water. >> reporter: after the ship finally docked last night, passengers were busied. many took charter flights home. >> some passengers are complaining that carnival's response to the emergency was slow and inadequate. but triumph's on-board crewmembers are getting high praise. >> they had to walk around with rubber gloves, gas masks and pick up these potty bags. >> they always had this smile on their face. they helped you, no matter what. >> reporter: one thing passengers di
studios, hollywood, universal city walk. have a great show. >> oh, oh, oh, oh. >> can you feel the love? >> hoda, we can feel the love. we are so in love with southern california. >> sit down. take a load off. >> get comfy. get cozy. >> we have a little issue here at universal studios, hollywood on city walk. we want to thank the los angeles bureau -- >> l.a. tourism board. >> that's what i meant. >> we keep thanking them every day. if i had my way, we would keep thanking them for the next two months, you know what i'm saying? >> of course you would. since you came out today on this beautiful sun-splashed day in l.a., somebody in this audience is going to get an incredible prize. now, you don't even know what we're talking about, but we're going to pick names out of a bowl or a wine glass and we are going to choose somebody. >> that's closer by. what's that supposed to mean, ma'am? >> anyway, we've been having a lot of fun. we want to wish a happy birthday to the folks here at city walk because it's their 20th birthday. >> happy 20th birthday. >> who knew? >> we've got some bir
for the city of santa cruz. who officers shot to death in a city that has not even lost one offer -- officer in the line of duty. detective sergeant lauren butch baker, 27 years with the department and detective elizabeth butler 10 years with the department have been identified as the victims. police also killed the gunman, matt keller is live at the scene. >> reporter: that briefing with investigators and santa cruz's major just ended -- santa cruz' mayor just gave the statement. the first shots came at 3:30 at a house across the street from a whole foods market and schools skwr-tz i heard a round of 40 to -- >> i heard a round of 40 to 50 shots across the street from where our children are. >> we lost two exceptionally fine officers today. >> reporter: a suspect was also shot to death but the sheriff said he ordered a door to door search as the sun went down just to make sure there was not another suspect. with many people still trapped inside the perimeter. >> s.w.a.t. teams you know told her to stay down and she's been down ever since. >> reporter: three schools were put on lock down. a
that freed that little boy. victor blackwell, live from midland city, alabama this morning. i know you're very excited to be sharing this information, victor. what do we know about the raid and why law enforcement actually decided to go in? >> good morning, zoraida. two reasons primarily. the first is because authorities say they observed jimmy lee dykes with a gun and the second reason is because in the day leading up to that raid, the communications with dykes had broken down. so they realized they could not wait any longer to go in and rescue ethan. ethan is safe. this is a photograph of the 5-year-old being taken into a hospital after nearly a week being held in an underground bunker in alabama. >> he's fine. he's laughing, playing, joking, eating, the things you would expect a normal 5-year-old or 6-year-old young man to do. he's very brave, he's very lucky. the success story is that he is out safe and doing great. >> reporter: the dramatic end came after officers saw 65-year-old jimmy lee dykes holding a weapon. they felt they could not hold off any longer. >> at this point, fbi
on the streets, you see cabs. not so much right now, huh? >> new york city, right? the city that never sleeps. this is a city that is in the middle of a deep slumber. when was the last time you saw the streets practically empty. look at the circle, columbus circle, practically empty. a couple cabs, maybe a snow plow if you're lucky, maybe a city bus. empty. it's like a white christmas today. isn't it? a winter wonderland. it is cold, i'll tell you that, but it's snowing and it's a quiet snow. not much wind going on. so really kind of a calm overhang on this evening in the middle of the night. the snow, though, is continuing to pile up. what i find interesting, though, is i really haven't seen many snow plows go by and the city has promised they were on patrol as of 7:00 tonight. perhaps they're in the boroughs in the neighborhoods making their way through. one interesting difference to this year, though, different from the blizzard that hit here in 2010, the city's kind of learned about it, learned from its mistakes, they have got kind of, brooke, a gps tracker of where the snow plows are. so
what happened in russia. a meteor the size of a city bus streaked across the sky over the you'll mounts. nasa reporting it appeared brighter than the sun. traveling at around 40,000 miles an hour, fast enough that if you were to hitch a ride, it would get from you new york to l.a. in four minutes time flat. early estimates were it weighed ten tons. nasa says now more like 7,000. it ripped through the air like a blade through fabric triggering sonic booms and an immense shock wave when it exploded. when it shattered miles above the earth, we're told it released 20 times the energy, more powerful than the hiroshimo bomb in japan. it was powerful enough to knock down doors and shatter windows across one city. officials say more than 1,000 people went for medical treatment. flying glass blamed for most of those injuries. one witness saying when older women in the neighborhood spotted it, they started screaming that the world was ending. and just about everybody seemed a little freaked out. >> it was very confusing because the building was shaking a little bit, so initially i thought it was
residents will be able to turn in their guns for cash today. the cities of menlo park, palo alto and east palo alto will hold a gun buy back. the event is from ten to two and all weapons will be accepted anonymously. >>> anti violence groups will also hold a rally in conjunction with that. it's at 11:00. jackie spear will be among a number of speakers. >>> today's events come a day after a day of action to end gun violence. dozens of people part paided in a vigil to remember victims of gun violence. that event was part of a national movement to pressure congress for action on new gun control laws. >> new this morning in his weekly address the president said congress must act now before automatic budget cuts kick in on march first. >> once the cuts take effect, thousands of teachers will be laid off and tens of thousands of parent also have to rush to find child care for their kids. >> the president accuses republicans of failing to meet him halfway. he is calling for tax reform and moderate spending cuts. gop leaders say spending must be pulled into prevent a larger deficit. the presid
today to flood the streets of baltimore. >> through the charm city. it was a chance for the team to thank fans and for fans to thank the team for bringing home the championship. >> news4's chris gordon joins us now lye from baltimore with more on the charm offensive. >> reporter: it is said that baltimore is a blue-collar town with a chip on its shoulder. but today was filled with respect for the ravens and the city that they serve and love and the fans here and it all began this super bowl victory celebration. it began at city hall with the team's arrival and the super bowl trophy showing it to their fans, sharing it for the first time. and then the parade. there was a marching band, the cheerleaders, ravens, on floats, and in military vehicles. waving to the crowds that line the streets right to the center of the city and as they made their way to mnt bank stadium. back home, to their home turf, for their final appearance of the season, and it really paid off. we asked some of the fans given the events of the day, what would they tell a friend? what was the best thing? >> it wa
of the baltimore city training academy have been suspended pending the outcome of this investigation. police are conducting a criminal investigation into this case. tuesday was the first time baltimore police have ever use that facility for training. jennifer franciotti, wbal-tv 11 news. >> thank you. mental health is back into the spotlight. police say dayvon green shot and killed himself after shooting stephen rane. he saw green plot a gun and ran from the scene. rane died longmont after being shot. green had been suffering from mental illness -- rane died after being shot. >> we need to talk to college students if your roommate seems like they're having a difficult. did not keep it to yourself. seek out an adult to talk it out with and maybe they can help you to get that student to the residence assistant. >> college students receiving mental health services rank their counseling as excellent or good. former maryland first lady kendel ehrlich will be a possible replacement. she will be joined by a state delegate and another. they are vying to replace john leopold who resigned last month.
covering the major storm from all angles. we'll begin with the city that will get hit first, that is new york. alison kosik, do we understand if they're prepared? lost her. we'll go to susan candiotti in boston, another place the storm is hitting. we know there will be a lot, a lot, a lot of snow. are they ready? >> reporter: to put it bluntly, i think they are, we certainly hope they are. the city hopes bostonians are. certainly they and new englanders are used to huge nor'easters and blizzards like this. 35 years ago, you had the storm of '78, when they had more than 27 inches. this could rival those record amounts. we'll have to see what happens. but as of now, noontime is zero hour. a snow emergency has gone into effect and now people are being told that's it, get off the streets. if your car is there, it's going to ghettet towed. so certainly if take you a look at the store shelf, they are empty. it is clear that people have been fwg out within the last 24, 48 hours since these warnings began. buying all kinds of essential supplies, including nonperishable foods, water, batteries fl
of these were to explode over a big city, that's the he said of the big city. i can't express this enough. so we could as human kind get together and go looking for these things. these things are going so fast, the atmosphere is just like concrete. >> i wanted our viewers to see this again because it really is so incredible when you look at the video and the sound there. is there any risk when you talk about the astroid getting so close to earth that the same thing could happen? >> this? oh, no. if that astroid would hit the earth that we're talking about today that's getting close, there would be significantly more damage than this. and, no, it is not going to happen. it does not get that close. it does get inside the big ring that we have, 22,000 miles in space. but if you take a look, if you make a sphere of that ring, you're talking about 8 million square miles of area out there and only just a few things to hit. we'll be just fine. the earth is in good shape and so are all the satellites. the odds are not zero, but i could probably win the lottery instead. >> were the russians warn that had
, josh will arm you with some smart things to say. >> new orleans is definitely a city that knows how to party, this is actually the tenth super bowl they're hosting. >> it is. >>> also this morning, the gun control battle heats up after the white house releases this photo of the president skeet shooting at camp david on his birthday last august. well, the photo has generated lots of buzz. some people even claiming it was doctored, so how will it play into the red hot gun debate? george stephanopoulos joins us live with more about that. >> some skepticism this morning. >>> and back to football quickly. check this out. this 6-year-old went viral crying because she couldn't propose, propose marriage, that is, to her favorite player j.j. watt. coming up we'll show you his extraordinary response and we're going to speak to him live, as well. as we said that is coming up. >>> but we'll start with the breaking news overnight. an ex-navy s.e.a.l. murdered at a gun range in texas allegedly by a troubled former marine. this comes in the middle of america's debate over gun control and rising co
. ♪ >> now for the happy segment. do you live in one of the most miserable cities in america? "forbes" magazine released its annual list for 2013 and the most miserable is detroit, the motor city earning the number within spot this year with its high crime rate, high unemployment and deep financial woes. forbes looked at unemployment, violent crime, taxes and commute times and the weather. most of the top ten included three cities from michigan, three from california and three from illinois. and then number ten, our great city here, new york. let's look at these pictures before and after in cadillac, michigan. this is the cadillac building, right? and that was before and after. that's the grand central station. greg, you noticed -- you pitched this story, which was a great one because you noticed a common denominator. >> yeah. almost all the mayors are democrat and the ones that claim they are democrats are very liberal, like michael bloomberg. he ran as a republican because he couldn't run as a democrat. it's funny, when you look at detroit, it looks like it was hit by a hurricane a
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 73 (some duplicates have been removed)